Grenfell Urban Landcare news

A large crowd participated in the Vaughn's Dam TSR walk.
A large crowd participated in the Vaughn's Dam TSR walk.

Vaughn’s Dam Travelling Stock Route (TSR), in the heart of Grenfell, was the scene of a recent spring flora walk, when twenty five people spent the morning wandering through the box gum woodland site, learning about its ecological values and the flora and fauna that live within its boundaries.

Participants included students from the Grenfell TAFE’s plant and soil knowledge course, local residents, outdoor staff from Weddin Shire Council and staff from Central West Local Land Services (CW LLS).

The 11.7 hectare site is situated to the south of the railway line and runs between Henry Lawson Way and Holy Camp Rd.

The spring walk was organised by CW LLS as part of their Targeted Ecosystems Spring Walks Program and was led by Weddin Landcare Coordinator Mikla Lewis.

Mikla pointed out the important habitat features, such as large old living and dead trees with hollows, fallen timber and leaf litter, regenerating Blakely’s Red Gums and Yellow Box trees, the sedge-lined creek and of course, the dam.

A number of water birds, including herons, ducks, cormorants, coots and grebes, have been seen on the dam and a number were present on the day.

Over 30 species of native birds have been recorded at the site so far, including the threatened Superb Parrot.

Central West Local Land Services Field Officer Terry South gave an interesting talk on St John’s Wort, a prominent weed at the site, and the biological controls introduced by the LLS in an effort to reduce its presence.

The Travelling Stock Route is degraded by many other weeds as well, including broom, European olive, palms, African boxthorn and privet.

In fact weed species almost outnumber local native species!

Nevertheless, there is still a great diversity of native flora, with five local native tree species, 7 shrubs, at least 15 grasses and well over 30 forbs (herbs or wildflowers) recorded at the site so far.

Other Australian natives not local to the Grenfell area, such as some wattles and silky oak, have been planted there in the past.

Grenfell Urban Landcare, under Weddin Landcare, will be gradually restoring the site by removing the woody weeds and replanting with local native species.

Mikla Lewis - Landcare Coordinator

Grenfell Urban Landcare, under Weddin Landcare, will be gradually restoring the site by removing the woody weeds and replanting with local native species.

If you would like to take part in working bees at the site please contact Mikla on 0499 199 016 or email weddin@lachlandcare.org.au