History of Grenfell's porcelain art

The history of Porcelain painting, earlier known as china painting, in Grenfell began with Young artist, Daphne Appelbee offering lessons for beginners in 1977.

Porcelain painting is a process that requires using the correct paints and oils, applied to a porcelain item then fired in a kiln to an average temperature of 800 degrees to make the design permanent. Many people believe that the art work will wash off and is not safe for food. This is far from correct, one has only to read of pieces of broken porcelain found in rubble in ancient cities, still with the colour and design intact. Any  item is safe to use with recommendation to avoid constant dishwasher use , particularly if the design has enamels or gold work.

Many pieces are fired several times and the artist must understand the application and temperatures required for a variety of different colours, pastes, enamels and golds.   Glassware may also be painted and fired for permanency, though again using suitable paints and firing temperatures. Our early group was quite small and met in the tin shed at the back of the Gunyah, where we sweltered in summer and froze in winter. Being absolutely dedicated to our art we kept on despite being almost overcome by the fumes of the heater along with the oils and medium used! What dedication! `​Episode 2 next week..

June, Marg Troy, Joan Nealon, Doris Matthews, Doreen, Laurie Collison, Jean Hughes, Joan Bolton & Doris Sellers at a 1985 Celia Larsen seminar.

June, Marg Troy, Joan Nealon, Doris Matthews, Doreen, Laurie Collison, Jean Hughes, Joan Bolton & Doris Sellers at a 1985 Celia Larsen seminar.